kylerzeleny:

Yashica 124G, The Prairies, Canada.
Book available here: Out West

Always rub honey into wounds instead of salt.

— Meggie Royer (via iamcharliesangel)

50,000 years ago, there are not even a million people on the planet. 10,000 years ago, there’s, like, two million people on the planet. Now there’s between five and six billion people on the planet, right? Now, if we all have our own, like, individual, unique soul, right, where do they all come from? You know, are modern souls only a fraction of the original souls? ‘Cause if they are, that represents a 5,000 to 1 split of each soul in the last 50,000 years, which is, like, a blip in the Earth’s time. You know, so at best we’re like these tiny fractions of people, you know, walking… I mean, is that why we’re so scattered? You know, is that why we’re all so specialized?

— Richard Linklater (Before Sunrise)
likeafieldmouse:

Emma McNally

Do not chase people. Be you and do your own thing and work hard. The right people who belong in your life will come to you, and stay.

Wu Tang Clan  (via jalaoshi)

Somewhere in the Bosnian forest by (BricePortolano)
currentsinbiology:

Scientists wipe out malaria-carrying mosquitoes in the lab by creating male-only offspring
Scientists have modified mosquitoes to produce sperm that will only create males, pioneering a fresh approach to eradicating malaria.
In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, scientists from Imperial College London have tested a new genetic method that distorts the sex ratio of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, the main transmitters of the malaria parasite, so that the female mosquitoes that bite and pass the disease to humans are no longer produced.
In the first laboratory tests, the method created a fully fertile mosquito strain that produced 95 per cent male offspring.
The scientists introduced the genetically modified mosquitoes to five caged wild-type mosquito populations. In four of the five cages, this eliminated the entire population within six generations, because of the lack of females. The hope is that if this could be replicated in the wild, this would ultimately cause the malaria-carrying mosquito population to crash.
This is the first time that scientists have been able to manipulate the sex ratios of mosquito populations. The researchers believe the work paves the way for a pioneering approach to controlling malaria.

little shoes

can we hear the tiny feet

of spiders deep in the night.

dancing through the bed sheets

discovering a place to hide.

shepherd’s delight

the sky is pink tonight

and all i can smell

is the crossing of man

and cranberry scent on my chest.